Flirting with Zemanta, WordAds, and the New Look of WordPress’ Dashboard

WordPress

WordPress (Photo credit: Adriano Gasparri)

 

It has really been a while since I blogged using a free-hosted WordPress blog.  Upon opening this new blog using WordPress, I felt like a balik-bayan revisiting his hometown.   Everything looks familiar and new at the same time.

 

Just look at this!

 

wordpress dashboard screencap

Click picture to enlarge.

 

 

 

I don’t really know how to describe it except that it has a cleaner, crisper feel to it.  Unlike the previous dashboards where all the panels and elements had that grey-blue color, the new dashboard’s left side panel is brown-grey and much easier to see.

 

WordAds

 

wordadsMost of the items on the side panel are pretty much the same as the previous ones, but one thing that I did notice just a few minutes ago was the WordAds option in Settings.

 

One of the things that stopped me from blogging on free-hosted WordPress was the fact that I couldn’t put Google Adsense on it and there was a time when I was really, really bent on getting those high-paying clicks.

 

It’s has taken WordPress quite a long time to come up with what I assume to be an affiliate ads revenue program and while it seems late in the game, it might still turn out to be a great feature to have.

 

But of course, having ads and earning actual money from them requires a really good understanding of what type of content draws in what type of ad and that, in turn, gets clicked.

 

As far as Google Adsense is concerned, I’ve found the process to be confounding and quite difficult to successfully implement as well as succeed at.  I’ve yet to WordAds and apparently, you have to qualify for it — so I won’t be able to tell you much about it at this point.

 

Zemanta

 

zemantaBefore giving you the block-quoted scrape from the about page of http://www.zemanta.com, let me just say that it’s made WordPress “social” in a way that Facebook and Twitter will never be.

 

There was a time, not long ago, that you either waited for someone to read your article and throw you a back-link.  That or you’d openly solicit back-links or go on commenting sprees hoping that the the owner of the site/blog would allow you to post your blog’s URL in the comment section.

 

Good anchor text and backlinks are still pretty much key in getting good quality traffic — meaning a steady flow of visits from people who would most likely think your article is helpful because it is what they are looking for.  It also makes your post or article more searchable or easier to find on search engines, thereby giving your blog/site a bit of the stream of billions of searches run everyday on these search engines.

 

You’ll find the Zemanta panel on the lower right side of the screen, just below where you’d usually find “Set Featured Image”.

 

It basically offers you suggestions for pictures and related posts — which is actually the best thing about it. The related posts options suggests posts from other WordPress blogs also equipped with Zemanta and when you include their links as a related post, these blogs are sent track-backs which the authors can approve.  Once approved, the link to your blog appears on their post as well.

 

So far, Zemanta has really lived up to its promise of giving me traffick, likes for the posts, and yes, the ultimate proof of engagement, COMMENTS!

 

Now for the block-quote:

 

Content to bloggers

Zemanta brings articles, images and websites to bloggers. It matches text with publicly available content and displays it right in the creation tool as it is being written. It works within WordPress, Blogger, Typepad and Tumblr.

Authors to peers

Zemanta creates connections between writers who write about similar topics. It builds services that help with content research as well as promotional tools that extend content reach and facilitate communication between authors.

Publishers to marketers

Zemanta explores ways of connecting content creators to content marketers. We create relationships that bring revenue to independent publishers and exposure to advertisers. Users can join programs that sponsor creation and award quality content.

 

 

 

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